Click Question to Get Free Answers >

Real Numbers NCERT Solutions : Class 10 Maths

NCERT Solutions for Class 10 Maths : Real Numbers

Doubtnut
DoubtnutDoubtnut
Filter
Filters :
    Classes
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
    Chapters
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  • 4 More
    Exercises
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
cancel imageFilter
Apply
CLASSES
    Change Class
CHAPTERS
    Change Chapter
EXERCISES

NCERT Class 10 | REAL NUMBERS | Exercise 01 | Question No. 05

Use Euclid's division lemma to show that the cube of any positive integer is of the form `9m` , `9m+1` or `9m+8` .

play button

NCERT Class 10 | REAL NUMBERS | Exercise 01 | Question No. 04

Use Euclid's division lemma to show that the square of any positive integer is either of the form `3m` or `3m+1` for some integer m. [Hint: Let x be any positive integer then it is of the form `3q` , `3q+1` or `3q+2` Now square each of these and sho

play button

NCERT Class 10 | REAL NUMBERS | Exercise 01 | Question No. 01

Use Euclid's division algorithm to find the HCF of (i) 135 and 225            (ii) 196 and 38220       (iii) 867 and 255

play button

NCERT Class 10 | REAL NUMBERS | Exercise 01 | Question No. 03

An army contingent of 616 members is to march behind an army band of 32 members in a parade. The two groups are to march in the same number of columns. What is the maximum number of columns in which they can march?

play button

NCERT Class 10 | REAL NUMBERS | Exercise 01 | Question No. 02

Show that any positive odd integer is of the form `6q+1` or `6q+3` or `6q+5`, where q is some integer

play button
 Latest from Doubtnut
play button
play button
play button
play button
play button

Doubtnut one of the best online education platform provides free NCERT Solutions of Maths for Class 10 Real Numbers which are solved by our maths experts as per the NCERT (CBSE) guidelines. We provide the solutions as video solutions in which concepts are also explained along with answer which will help students while learning , preparing for exams and in doing homework. These Solutions will help to revise complete syllabus and score more marks in examinations.

Get here free, accurate and comprehensive NCERT Solutions for Class 10 Maths Real Numbers which have been reviewed by our maths counsellors as per the latest edition following up the CBSE guidelines. We provide video solutions in which solutions to all the questions of NCERT Class 10 Maths textbook are explained in step by step and detailed way.

The Topics of the Chapter Real Numbers are :

EUCLIDS DIVISION LEMMA

EUCLIDS DIVISION ALGORITHM

APPLICATIONS OF THE FUNDAMENTAL THEOREM OF ARITHMETIC

THE FUNDAMENTAL THEOREM OF ARITHMETIC

DIVISIBILITY

SOME APPLICATIONS OF THE FUNDAMENTAL THEOREM OF ARITHMETIC

It contains these exercises along with solved examples. All the exercises are solved in the video. Select the exercise to view the solutions exercisewise of the Chapter Real Numbers:

NCERT Solutions Class 10 Maths Chapter Real Numbers Exercises:

We have covered all the exercises and also Solved examples in the videos. Along with the practise exercise Students should also practise solved examples to clear the concepts of the Real Numbers. If incase you have any doubt you can watch the solutions for the given questions.Watch the solutions for the given questions in which it is also explained in the video steps to solve the questions along with answers.

 

NCERT Class 10 Maths Solutions Chapter 1 Real Numbers

 

Class 10 Maths Chapter introduces the concepts of Real Numbers.  Here, in this chapter, different important topics have been included like Euclid’s Division, The Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic, Revisiting Irrational Numbers, Revisiting Rational Numbers and Their Decimal Expansions. Students get the right idea on how to work on different problems and come up with the best solutions. This has been further made more interesting and easier with the help of the different examples as well as exercise that have been provided by the expert team of Doubtnut. By finding the best and accurate solutions, students do not find it any difficulty in getting the right idea about it.

NCERT textbooks are advised by the CBSE where the students manage to clear the different basic concepts. But it becomes a problem for the students to get an in-depth understanding of the different lessons. This makes it difficult for them to attempt certain difficult questions that are set in the examination papers. It leads to very fewer marks in Maths for which they feel quite disappointed as well. In this case, finding the best and useful reference books is the only option that becomes available for them. These guide books prove to be somewhat useful for them in the best way.

It has been understood by the team of the best expert teachers of Doubtnut that unless students of Class 10 Maths are able to clear their queries, it would never be possible for them to score good marks in the examination. So, with the aim of providing the students with the perfect education, it has come up with the most useful online study materials. This truly proves to be of much use to them where they can clear their queries by opting for the video tutorials. It is also possible to get NCERT Solutions For class 10 maths which proves to be an added advantage for them to get the ultimate idea.

Topics and Subtopics included in NCERT Solutions for Class 10 Maths Chapter 1 Real Numbers

Introduction

You have explored the world of real numbers and irrational numbers in Class IX. Here, we would concentrate on two important properties of positive integers which are Euclid’s division algorithm and the Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic.

When it comes to Euclid’s division algorithm, it involves the divisibility of integers. On the other hand, the Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic involves the multiplication of positive integers.

Euclid’s Division Lemma

Let’s have a look at the following folk puzzle.

A trader was on his way to sell eggs. Another person came in front of him and started to argue with him. This turned into a quarrel where the person pulled the basket that was filled with eggs and dashed it on the floor where the eggs broke. The trader called up the police and requested him to ask the person to play for the broken eggs. When the panchayat asked the trader how many eggs were broken, said:

If counted in pairs, one will remain;

If counted in threes, two will remain;

If counted in fours, three will remain;

If counted in fives, four will remain;

If counted in sixes, five will remain;

If counted in sevens, nothing will remain;

My basket cannot accommodate more than 150 eggs.

Now can you solve this puzzle as to how many eggs were there? Let us assume the number of eggs to be “x” where we can understand that “x” is less than or equal to 150.

If counted in sevens, nothing will remain, which translates to x = 7p + 0, for some natural number p.

If counted in sixes, x = 6q+5, for some natural number q.

If counted in fives, four will remain. It translates to x = 5w + 4, for some natural number w.

If counted in fours, three will remain. It translates to x = 4s + 3, for some natural number s.

If counted in threes, two will remain. It translates to x = 3t + 2, for some natural number t.

If counted in pairs, one will remain. It translates to x = 2u + 1, for some natural number u.

That is, in each case, we have x and a positive integer b (in our example, b takes values 7, 6, 5, 4, 3 and 2, respectively) which divides a and leaves a remainder r (in our case, r is 0, 5, 4, 3, 2 and 1, respectively), that is smaller than b. So, we use Euclid’s division lemma.

Here we need to look for the multiples of 7. By making use of trial and error method (with the use of LCM), we can find that he had 119 eggs.

So, let us have a look at the following pairs of integers

17, 6;     5, 12;    20,4

We can try to write the relations as:

17 = 6 × 2 + 5 (6 goes into 17 twice and leaves a remainder 5)

5 = 12 × 0 + 5 (This relation holds since 12 is larger than 5)

20 = 4 × 5 + 0 (Here 4 goes into 20 five-times and leaves no remainder)

That is, for each pair of positive integers a and b, we have found whole numbers q and r, satisfying the relation:

                                    x = bq + r, 0 ≤ r < b

 

Do note that q or r can also be zero.

 

Theorem 1.1 (Euclid’s Division Lemma)

Given positive integers a and b, there exist unique integers q and r satisfying a = bq + r, 0 ≤ r < b. It is to be noted that a series of well defined steps that provides a procedure for coming up with the solution for a type of problem is called an algorithm. Computing the Highest Common Factor (HCF) of two given positive integers is used by the technique of Euclid’s Division Lemma.

If we need to find the HCF of the integers 455 and 42, we have to make sure of starting with the larger integer which is 455. By using Euclid’s Division Lemma, we get  

      455 = 42 x 10 + 35

By considering the divisor 42 and the remainder 35, we get

          42 = 35 x 1 + 7

Now by considering the divisor 35 and the remainder 7, we get

            35 = 7 x 5 + 0

 

So, we cannot proceed as the remainder has become zero.  It can be claimed that the HCF of 455 and 42 is the divisor at this stage, which is 7                                                                                        

The Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic

Earlier, we have learned that any natural number can be written as a product of its prime factors. For example, 2 is equal to 2, 4 = 2 x 2, 253 = 11 x 23, etc.

Let us take any collection of prime numbers like 2, 3, 7, 11 and 23. We can produce a large collection of positive integers if we happen to multiply the same or all of these numbers.

 

7 × 11 × 23 = 1771                          3 × 7 × 11 × 23 = 5313                  

2 × 3 × 7 × 11 × 23 = 10626           23 × 3 × 73 = 8232

22 × 3 × 7 × 11 × 23 = 21252 

                             

Let’s use the factor tree by taking some large number, say 32760 and factorise as below:

 

 

 

So we have factorised 32760 as 2 × 2 × 2 × 3 × 3 × 5 × 7 × 13 as a product of primes, i.e., 32760 = 23 × 32 × 5 × 7 × 13 as a product of powers of primes. Let us try another number, say, 123456789. This can be written as 32 × 3803 × 3607. Of course, you have to check that 3803 and 3607 are primes. In fact, this statement is true and is called the Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic because of its basic crucial importance to the study of integers.

Theorem 1.2 (Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic)

Every composite number can be expressed (factorised) as a product of primes, and this factorisation is unique, apart from the order in which the prime factors occur. Here, we can take an example where we regard 3 x 5 x 7 x 2 as same as 2 x 3 x 5 x 7.

In general, given a composite number x, we factorise it as x = p1p2 ... pn, where p1, p2,.., pn are primes and written in ascending order, i.e., p1 ≤ p2 ≤ . . . ≤ pn. If we combine the same primes, we will get powers of primes. For example, 32760 = 2 × 2 × 2 × 3 × 3 × 5 × 7 × 13 = 23 × 32 × 5 × 7 × 13.

So, there are many applications of the Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic which can be seen both within mathematics and in other fields.

Let’s take an example:

Find the HCF of 96 and 404 by the prime factorisation method. Hence, find their LCM.

 

Solution: The prime factorisation of 96 and 404 gives :

 

               96 = 25 × 3, 404 = 22 × 101 Therefore, the HCF of these two integers is 22 = 4.

 

Also,           LCM (96, 404) = 96 x 404        = 96 x404 = 9696

                                          HCF (96, 404)          4

 

Revisiting Irrational Numbers

You have been introduced to irrational numbers as well as their properties in Class IX. If you recall then it is to be noted that a number, “s” is called irrational if it is not possible to write in the form p where p and q                                                                                                  

q are integers and q is not equal to zero.

Theorem Let p be a prime number. If p divides a2, then p divides a, where a is a positive integer.

Proof : Let the prime factorisation of a be as follows:

a = p1p2 . . . pn, where p1, p2,… pn are primes, not necessarily distinct.

Therefore, a2 = (p1p2 . . . pn)(p1p2 . . . pn) = p21p22 . . . p2n.

Now, we are given that p divides a2. Therefore, from the Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic, it follows that p is one of the prime factors of a2. However, using the uniqueness part of the Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic, we realise that the only prime factors of a2 are p1, p2,… pn. So p is one of p1, p2,... ., pn. Now, since a = p1 p2 . . . pn, p divides a.

So, we can give proof that the square root of 2 is irrational. This is known as proof of contradiction.

Revisiting Rational Numbers and Their Decimal Expansions

You have learned that there is either a terminating or non-terminating repeating decimal expansion in Class IX.  Let’s have a look at an example:

Consider the following rational numbers:

 

  1.   0.375 = 375  = 375                          (ii)  0.104 =104 = 104
  1.             1000       103                                          1000     103

 

(iii)  0.0875 = 875  = 875                          (iv)  23.3408 =233408 =233408

                  10000    104                                                 10000       104

 

We can see that all can be expressed as rational numbers whose denominators are powers of 10. If we cancel the common factors between the numerator and denominator, then we get.

 

  1. 0.375 = 375   = 375 = 3 x 53  = 3                                

            1000    103    23 x 53    23  

  1. 0.104 =104 = 104 = 13 x 2= 13         

                  1000    103    23 x 53       53

 

  1. 0.0875 = 875  = 875 =      7   

                     10000   104    24 x 5

 

 

  1. 23.3408 =233408 = 233408

                104            54

 

           So, we can see that a real number has been converted whose decimal expansion terminates into a rational number of the form p where both p and q are coprime.                                                                  

Significance of Doubtnut for Class 10 Maths Students

Doubtnut’s NCERT Class 10 Maths Solutions Chapter 1 has covered all the topics and subtopics that help the students to find a clear idea about it.  Some of the advantages of the video tutorials are as follows:

 

  • Provides crisp and clear understanding: The expert team of tutors in Doubtnut has used very simple language to describe the different topics. So, this acts as a boon to the students where they get accurate knowledge in the best manner.  Thus, taking the right steps to opt for the best and useful online study materials can surely help to achieve good marks in the examinations.
  • Proves to be flexible: The courses that are available can also be downloaded online. Thus, if a student gets it downloaded, then it would be possible to access it from anywhere. So, this truly acts to be quite useful where they can find it quite flexible in learning from their own pace and time.
  • No fees or payment required: Another advantage of Doubtnut’s online study materials is that students do not have to pay any sort of money to access it. This really proves to be of much use to them where it becomes quite convenient to get the best solutions online without any sort of problem at all. So, if any student of Class 10 finds any problem in understanding Maths, then Doubtnut can act as a savior for them.

Share this on :-

bottom open in app