Click Question to Get Free Answers >

Sets NCERT Solutions : Class 11 Maths

NCERT Solutions for Class 11 Maths : Sets

Doubtnut
DoubtnutDoubtnut
Filter
Filters :
    Classes
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
    Chapters
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  • 6 More
    Exercises
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
cancel imageFilter
Apply
CLASSES
    Change Class
CHAPTERS
    Change Chapter
EXERCISES

NCERT Class 11 | SETS | Miscellaneous Exercise | Question No. 15

In a survey of 60 people, it was found that 25 people read newspaper H. 26 read newspaper T, 26 read newspaper 1, 9 read both H and I. 11 read both H and T, 8 read both T and I, 3 read all three newspapers. Find: (i) the number of people who read at least one of the newspapers. (ii) the number of people who read exactly one newspaper.

play button

NCERT Class 11 | SETS | Miscellaneous Exercise | Question No. 12

Find sets A, B and C such that `AnnB`, `BnnC` and `AnnC` are non empty sets and `AnnBnnC=phi` .

play button

NCERT Class 11 | SETS | Miscellaneous Exercise | Question No. 13

In a survey of 600 students in a school, 150 students were found to be taking tea and 225 taking coffee, 100 were taking both tea and coffee. Find how many students were taking neither tea nor coffee?

play button

NCERT Class 11 | SETS | Miscellaneous Exercise | Question No. 10

Show that `A nnB" "=" "A nnC` need not imply `B" "=" "C` .

play button

NCERT Class 11 | SETS | Solved Examples | Question No. 31

For any sets A and B. show that `P(A nnB)" "=" "P(A)nn P(B)dot`

play button
 Latest from Doubtnut
play button
play button
play button
play button
play button

Doubtnut one of the best online education platform provides free NCERT Solutions of Maths for Class 11 Sets which are solved by our maths experts as per the NCERT (CBSE) guidelines. We provide the solutions as video solutions in which concepts are also explained along with answer which will help students while learning , preparing for exams and in doing homework. These Solutions will help to revise complete syllabus and score more marks in examinations.

Get here free, accurate and comprehensive NCERT Solutions for Class 11 Maths Sets which have been reviewed by our maths counsellors as per the latest edition following up the CBSE guidelines. We provide video solutions in which solutions to all the questions of NCERT Class 11 Maths textbook are explained in step by step and detailed way.

The Topics of the Chapter Sets are :

OPERATIONS ON SETS

VENN DIAGRAMS

UNIVERSAL SETS

EMPTY SETS

SUBSETS

SETS & THEIR REPRESENTATION

INTRODUCTION

SOME PRACTISE PROBLEMS ON OPERATION OF SETS

POWER SETS

EQUIVALENT SETS

RELATION

OPERATION ON REAL FUNCTION

It contains these exercises along with solved examples. All the exercises are solved in the video. Select the exercise to view the solutions exercisewise of the Chapter Sets:

NCERT Solutions Class 11 Maths Chapter Sets Exercises:

We have covered all the exercises and also Solved examples in the videos. Along with the practise exercise Students should also practise solved examples to clear the concepts of the Sets. If incase you have any doubt you can watch the solutions for the given questions.Watch the solutions for the given questions in which it is also explained in the video steps to solve the questions along with answers.

The concept of Sets is fundamental in modern mathematics. Nowadays this concept is used in different branches of mathematics and is widely used in the foundation of relations and functions. This chapter makes the study of a wide variety of materials related in some way. The chapter is important in the world of higher mathematics for building complex mathematical structures, for example, the ordered set (x1, x2, x3) of three points forms a vector in R³ if xi belongs to R. Concept of Sets can come with algebraic or topological properties that are useful. You will learn all this in this chapter in a systematic manner that is topic wise on our website, Doubtnut in the same way, as it is given in the NCERT class 11 maths. The NCERT book is preferably the best material to go through before sitting in the examinations as you will be assured that no topic is left untouched without giving enough information you will need in the academics.

NCERT textbooks are the best to do practice questions regarding any topic as they have the most updated format of the question provided in it, as asked in the examinations be it in the academics level or in the higher competition level. The book provides a summary at the end of every chapter for quick and easy revision. In a single paragraph, it provides enough points covering the most important concepts for sure. Thus, making the book look less thick and scary, and providing appropriate guidelines on the important concepts, especially for the CBSE board students, as it is their core syllabus to learn from as prescribed by the schools.

Doubtnut is an online portal that provides solutions to every chapter of the NCERT textbook in a comprehensive manner. We also provide the NCERT solutions in the pdf format for easy access. Doubtnut chooses the most effective methods to provide the solutions so that you can make most of it and learn it in a better way. These methods include video lectures and tutorials with the use of appropriate graphs, diagrams, and images etc. The solutions presented are free of cost and can be accessed by anyone from anywhere.

Topics & Subtopics of NCERT Class 11 Maths Chapter 1  Sets

DEFINITION OF SETS

A set is a well-defined group of distinct objects. They are denoted by capital letters A, B, C, X, Y, Z .....

EXAMPLES OF SETS:

1. The set of the entire stars in the sky.

2. The set of all months in a year, which has 30 days.

3. The set of all the triangles in the plane.

4. The set of all the states in India.

ELEMENTS OF THE SETS

The elements of the set are denoted by small letters in the alphabets of the English language; that is a, b, c....

If x is not an element of A, we will write x ϵ A (which is read as x belongs to A)

If x is not an element of A, then we will write it as x ϵ  A (which is read as x does not belong to A)

EXAMPLE:

If A ={1,2,3,4,5} ,then 3 belongs to A , 6 does not belongs to A.

REPRESENTATION OF A SET

There are two methods for representing a set.

TABULATION / ROSTER / ENUMERATION METHOD

We use curly brackets {} in this method after separating each of the input data with a comma.

REMARK:

1. The order of writing the elements in the set is immaterial, that is there is no fixed order to write the elements {a, b, c} {b, a, c} {c, a, b} they all denote the same set.

2. An element of a set is not repeated inside the brackets, for instance {1,2,3,4,2,3,3,3,4,4,4,4,4,4,4}

SET BUILDER METHOD

Under this method, the stating properties, which its elements are to satisfy, then we write:

           A= {xP(x)} or A= {x:P(x)}

In this case, it is read as ‘A is the set of elements x’ such that x has the property P.

REMARK:

1. “:” OR “| ” mean ‘such that’.

2. the other names of this method is property method, rule method, and symbolic method.

FOR INSTANCE:

If A = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8}, we can write this set as

A = {xϵ N: x8}.

Different types of sets

NULL / EMPTY / VOID

Sets having no element is called a null set or empty set. We use ᶲ or {}.

REMARK:

1. ᶲ is called the null set.

2. ᶲ is a unique set.

3. ᶲ is a subset of every set.

4. ᶲ is never written within braces i.e. {ᶲ} is not a null set.

5. {0} is not an empty set as it is containing the element zero (0).

FOR EXAMPLE:

{x: x² = 25 , x is even number} = ᶲ

SINGLETON OR UNIT SETS

A set having one and only one element is called singleton or unit set.

FOR EXAMPLE:

{x:x – 3 =4 }is a singleton set .

Since,               x-3 =4 x=7

Therefore {x: x -3 =4 } = {7}

SUBSET

If every element of set A is also an element of set B, then A is called the subset of B and written as AB (read as A is a subset of B or A is contained in B).

 A B <=> [x ϵ A => x ϵ B]

REMARK:

1. Every set is a subset itself

That is        AA

2. If AB, BC then AC

EXAMPLE:

1. if A = {2,3,4} and B = {5,4,2,3,1} , then AB.

TOTAL NUMBER OF SUBSETS

If a set D has n number of elements and we need to find out how many subsets can be formed from the set D then,

A = 2n

EQUAL SETS

Two sets are said to be equal if every element of A is an element of B, and every element of B is an element of A. If A and B are equal, we write A=B.

 It is clear that AB and BA <=> A=B

Example:

The sets {1,2,5} and {5,2,1} are equal.

POWER SET

The set of all the students of a given set A is said to be the power set A and is denoted by P(A) or 2A.

P(A) = {x:x A }

Thus, xϵ P(A) <=> x A.

REMARK:

1. ϕ and A are both elements of P (A).

2. If A= ϕthen P(ϕ) = {ϕ} , a singleton but ϕ is a null set .

3. If A has n elements, then P(A) has 2n elements.

SUPER SET

The statement AB if these A and B interchange the places then it can be said as B is the superset of A, and is written as AB.

PROPER SUBSET

A set A is said to be a proper subset of a set B if every element of A is an element of B and B ha at least one element of A and is denoted by AB (read as A is a proper subset of B )

EXAMPLE:

1. if A = {1,2,4} and B = {5,1,2,4,3} then AB since 3,5 A .

2. If A = {a, b, c} and B= {c, b, a}, then AB (since, B does not contain any element which is not in A)

3. NIQRC

FINITE AND INFINITE SETS

A set in which the process of counting of elements comes to an end is called a finite set; else if it is not countable it’s called an infinite set.

Example of finite sets:

1. Set of universities in India.

2. Set of natural numbers less than 500.

Example of infinite sets:

1. Set of all integers.

2. Set of all concentric circles with the centre as the origin.

CARDINAL NUMBER OF A FINITE SET

The number of distinct elements is a finite set A is called cardinal number and the cardinal number of a set A is denoted by n(A).

for example :

If A = {-3, -1 , 8 ,9 ,13 , 17}, then n (A) = 6 .

COMPARABILITY OF SETS

Two sets A and B are said to be comparable, if either AB or BA or A=B, otherwise A and B are said to be incomparable.

1. The set A = {1, 2, 3} and B = {1, 2, 3, 4, 6} are incomparable (since AB or BA or AB).

UNIVERSAL SET

All the sets under consideration are likely to be subsets of a set called the universal set and are denoted by Ω or S or U.

For example:

The set of all letters in the alphabet of English language U = {a, b, c,....., x, y, z} is the universal set of vowels in the alphabet of English language.

UNION OF SETS

The union of two sets A and B is the set of all those elements which are either in A or B or in both. This set is denoted by AB or A+B (read as A union B or A cup B or A join B).

      AB = {x:x ϵ A xϵB }

Or   AB=  {x:x ϵ A xϵ B}

 xϵ AB xϵA or x ϵ B

INTERSECTION OF SETS

The intersection of two sets A and B is the set of all elements, which are common in both the sets A and B.

Denoted by: A∩B

Example – A= {1,2,3} B={3,4,5,6}, then A∩B= {3}

DISJOINT SET

If the two sets A and B have no common elements. That is A∩B =ϕ, then the two sets A and B are called disjoint or mutually exclusive events.

Example:

If A = {a, b, c} B= {1, 2, 3}, then A∩ B = ϕ, therefore disjoint.

LAWS AND THEOREMS

IDEMPOTENT LAW

(1) AA =A                                                         (2) AA =A

Proof -

let xϵ AA x ϵ A or x ϵ A                           let x ϵ A∩A xϵ A and xϵ A

                                x ϵ A                                                       xϵ A

                                                   Hence, A A = A                

 IDENTITY LAWS

For, any set A,

1. Aϕ =A

2. A∩ϕ= ϕ

3.AU =U

4. A∩U=A

PROOF;

1. Let xϵAϕxϵA and xϵϕ

xϵA

Hence, Aϕ=A

2. xϵA∩ϕ xϵA and xϵϕ

xϵϕ

Hence, A ∩ϕ

3. Let xϵA U x ϵ A or xϵ U

xϵU

Hence, A U=U

4. Let xϵA∩U xϵA and xϵU

xϵA

Hence, A∩U=A

COMMUTATIVE LAW

For any two sets A and b

1. AB = BA

2. A∩B=B∩A

Proof:

1. Let xϵ AB xϵA or xϵ B

                    xϵ B or xϵA

                    xϵBA

Therefore xϵAB x ϵ B A

Hence, AB = BA

2. Let x ϵA∩B xϵA and xϵB

                   xϵB and xϵA

                   xϵB∩A

Therefore, xϵA∩B xϵB∩A

Hence, A∩B = B∩A

ASSOCIATIVE LAW

For any sets A, B, and C, we have

1. A(BC)=(AB)C

2. A∩(A∩B)= (A∩B)∩C

Proof:

1. Let x ϵ A(BC)xϵA or xϵBC

                           xϵA or (xϵB or xϵC)

                           (xϵA or xϵB ) or xϵ C

                           xϵAB or xϵC

                           xϵ (AB)C

                           xϵ(AB)C

Therefore, xϵ A(BC)x ϵ(AB)C

Hence, A(BC)=xϵ(AB)C

2. Let xϵA∩(B∩C) xϵA and xϵ B∩C

                          x ϵ A and (x ϵ B and x ϵ C)

                          (xϵ A and xϵ B ) and x ϵ C

                          xϵ(A∩B) and xϵ C

                          xϵ(A∩B)∩C

                          hence A∩(B∩C)=(A∩B)∩C

DISTRIBUTIVE LAW

For any three sets A, B, and C we have

1. A(BC)=(AB)(AC)

2. A∩(BC)=(AB)(AC)                      

For any two sets A and B we have

1. P(A)∩P(B)= P(A∩B)

2. P(A)P(B)P(AB)

DE-MORGAN’S LAWS

For any set A, B, C we have

(1) (AB) = A’∩B

(2) (A∩B)’= A’B

(3) A-(BC)=(A-B)(A-C)

(4) A-(B∩C)=(A-B)(A-C)

Benefits of Doubtnut

  1. For more information, you should visit and get connected to us through our website, Doubtnut.com, where you can find solutions to the problems of NCERT explained in simple language.
  2. You can also get the benefits of seeing and learning through our online video lectures conducted by the professionals.
  3. We make sure that not a single topic is left untouched so you don’t have to worry while watching a lecture on a single topic. We assure you that it is our core motive to explain each and everything. You can download the pdf NCERT solutions to keep abreast with your CBSE syllabus.
  4. Doubtnut also clear your doubts, all you have to do is take a picture of the doubt question from the maths book and post it on our website or app, you will receive the solution of the problem in seconds.

Share this on :-

bottom open in app