Click Question to Get Free Answers >

Mathematical Reasoning NCERT Solutions : Class 11 Maths

NCERT Solutions for Class 11 Maths : Mathematical Reasoning

Doubtnut
DoubtnutDoubtnut
Filter
Filters :
    Classes
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
    Chapters
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  • 6 More
    Exercises
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
cancel imageFilter
Apply
CLASSES
    Change Class
CHAPTERS
    Change Chapter
EXERCISES

NCERT Class 11 | MATHEMATICAL REASONING | Solved Examples | Question No. 08

Identify the type of "Or" used in the following statements and cheek whether the statements are true or false: (i) `sqrt(2)` is a rational number or an irrational number. (ii) To enter into a public library children need an identity card from the school authorities. (iii) A rectangle is a quadrilateral or a 5-sided polygon.

play button

NCERT Class 11 | MATHEMATICAL REASONING | Solved Examples | Question No. 09

Write the contra positive of the following statement: (i)         If a number is divisible by 9, then it is divisible by 3. (ii)        If you are born in India, then you are a citizen of India. (iii)       If a triangle is equilateral, it is isosceles.

play button

NCERT Class 11 | MATHEMATICAL REASONING | Solved Examples | Question No. 02

Write the negation of the following statements. (i) Both the diagonals of a rectangle have the same length. (ii) `sqrt(2)` is rational.

play button

NCERT Class 11 | MATHEMATICAL REASONING | Solved Examples | Question No. 03

Write the negation of the following statements and check whether the resulting statements are true, (i)         Australia is a continent. (ii)        There does not exist a quadrilateral which has all its sides equal, (iii)       Every natural number is greater than 0. (iv)       The sum of 3 and 4 is 9.

play button

NCERT Class 11 | MATHEMATICAL REASONING | Solved Examples | Question No. 01

Check whether the following sentences are statements. Give reasons for your answer. (i)   8 is less than 6. (ii)  Every set is a finite set. (iii) The sun is a star. (iv) Mathematics is fun. (v) There is no rain without clouds. (vi) How far is Chennai from here?

play button
 Latest from Doubtnut
play button
play button
play button
play button
play button

Doubtnut one of the best online education platform provides free NCERT Solutions of Maths for Class 11 Mathematical Reasoning which are solved by our maths experts as per the NCERT (CBSE) guidelines. We provide the solutions as video solutions in which concepts are also explained along with answer which will help students while learning , preparing for exams and in doing homework. These Solutions will help to revise complete syllabus and score more marks in examinations.

Get here free, accurate and comprehensive NCERT Solutions for Class 11 Maths Mathematical Reasoning which have been reviewed by our maths counsellors as per the latest edition following up the CBSE guidelines. We provide video solutions in which solutions to all the questions of NCERT Class 11 Maths textbook are explained in step by step and detailed way.

The Topics of the Chapter Mathematical Reasoning are :

BASIC CONNECTIVES

IMPLICATIONS

NEGATION OF STATEMENT

STATEMENTS

COMPOUND STATEMENTS

VALIDITY OF STATEMENTS

REASONING

INTRODUCTION

INVALIDITY OF STATEMENTS BY COUNTER EXAMPLES

QUANTIFIERS

It contains these exercises along with solved examples. All the exercises are solved in the video. Select the exercise to view the solutions exercisewise of the Chapter Mathematical Reasoning:

NCERT Solutions Class 11 Maths Chapter Mathematical Reasoning Exercises:

We have covered all the exercises and also Solved examples in the videos. Along with the practise exercise Students should also practise solved examples to clear the concepts of the Mathematical Reasoning. If incase you have any doubt you can watch the solutions for the given questions.Watch the solutions for the given questions in which it is also explained in the video steps to solve the questions along with answers.

In this chapter, we will get to learn about different topics like statements, new statements from old, compound statements, contrapositive, and converse, validating statements. Here the students will get to know how to assess various situations, apply problem-solving approaches, and draw rational conclusions. It will help the students to develop solutions and reflect on solutions and decide whether or not they make viewpoint. The reasoning is fundamental to grasping maths problems; it is an essential part of mathematics. With the proficiency in mathematical reasoning, the students can identify and understand how math makes sense in various aspects of our day to day life.

CBSE students should complete NCERT maths textbook initially, as it has everything a student needs to prepare for their exams. Almost every examination keeps the NCERT textbook as the reference, and the questions in the examination are more or less originated from NCERT so one should read and stick to this textbook to do wonders in academics and even in the competition level, by staying well connected to the text throughout the preparation. NCERT maths book has been assembled by the subject matter experts and experienced teachers. It is very important for the students to find accurate details on how to attempt different questions in Mathematics. Unless good and easy techniques are known to them, achieving success would become quite impossible that would only lead to disappointment and frustration.

Doubtnut is an online tutorial and an instant solution platform. The students can find video solutions to Maths textbooks like the NCERT, RD Sharma for the classes 6 to 12. Apart from the textbook solutions, Doubtnut also provides the learners with enough study material and mock tests for cracking competitive entrance examinations such as JEE Mains and Advanced. The team of experienced tutors has designed video tutorials in a simple and lucid language. The video tutorials help a lot to make the students to get an in-depth understanding of the different topics. So, this, in turn, helps them to clear their queries and attempt even the most difficult questions without any worry. Moreover, the NCERT solutions for class 11 maths can also be downloaded in pdf format for ease in accessing the solutions no matter whether one is traveling or does not have an internet connection.

 

Topics included NCERT Class 11 Maths Solutions Chapter 14 Mathematical Reasoning

Introduction

It is believed that over many millennia, human beings evolved from the lower species. It was the ability to reason for which humans were superior to other species. When it comes to the use of this ability, it depends on the power of reasoning. So, it is very important to find out as to how it is possible to develop this power. In this chapter, the process of reasoning shall be discussed in the context of Mathematics.

Statements

Mathematical statement is the basic unit which is involved in mathematical reasoning. Let us start with the below two sentences:

  1. The first President of India was a woman.
  2.  Elephant weighs more than a dog.

 

Did you read the sentences? Here, we can immediately say that the first sentence is false while the second is true. So, there is no sort of confusions regarding this. So, such sentences are known as statements in Mathematics.

Now let look at this sentence:

Girls are more intelligent than boys.

Now, this might have different perceptions of different people.  There would be some people who may think that the statement is true while some other sections of the people would never agree on it. In other words, this sentence is ambiguous. So, in Mathematics, such a sentence is not accepted as a statement.  So, a mathematically acceptable statement is a statement which is either true or false but not both.

Let’s look at an example:

Example: 

Check whether the following sentences are statements. Give reasons for your answer.

(i) Every set is a finite set.

(ii) 7 is less than 6.

(iii) Mathematics is fun. 

(iv) The sun is a star.

Solution:

(i) This sentence is false and it is a statement. The reasons are due to the fact that there are sets which are not finite.

(ii) This sentence is false because 7 is greater than 6. Hence it is a statement.

(iii) This sentence is subjective in the sense that for those who like mathematics, it may be fun but for others, it may not be. Hence it is not a statement.

(iv)It is a scientifically established fact that the sun is a star and, therefore, this sentence is always true. Hence it is a statement.

New Statements from Old

It is important to know the method for producing new statements from old that already exists.

  • Negation of a statement: The term, ”negation of a statement” implies the denial of a statement.

Now let us have a look at this statement:

       P: Mumbai is a city

When it comes to the negation of this statement, it is:

    It is not the case that Mumbai is a city

This can also be written as

     It is false that Mumbai is a city.

This can simply be expressed as

        Mumbai is not a city.

 

If we take p as a statement then it is to be noted that the negation of p is also a statement. This is denoted by ~p which is read as ‘not p.’

By looking at the negation of a statement, we may improve our understanding of it.

Let us consider the statement:

p: Everyone in France speaks French. The denial of this sentence tells us that not everyone in France speaks French. This does not mean that no person in France speaks French. It says merely that at least one person in France does not speak French.

Compound statements

It can be seen that there are many mathematical statements which are obtained with the combination of one or more statements. Here, some connecting words are used such as, “or”, “and”, etc

Now concentrate on the following statement:

p: There is something wrong with the wiring or with the bulb.

This statement tells us that there is something wrong with the wiring or there is something wrong with the bulb. Here, we can find that the given statement is actually made up of two smaller statements:

q: There is something wrong with the wiring. r: There is something wrong with the bulb.

connected by “or”

Now, suppose two statements are given as below:

p: 7 is an odd number. q: 7 is a prime number.

Here two statements can be combined with “and”

 r: 7 is both odd and prime number.

So, it can be called as a compound statement.

Now let’s do this:

Example:  Figure out the component statements from the following compound statements.

         (i) 0 is a positive number or a negative number

         (ii) The sky is blue and the grass is green.

         (iii) It is cold and it is raining.

Solution:

(i) The component statements are p: 0 is a positive number. q: 0 is a negative number. The connecting word is ‘or’.

         (ii) The component statements are p: The sky is blue and q: The grass is green.

          The connecting word is ‘and’.

 

         (iii) The component statements are p: It is cold and q: It is raining.

          The connecting word is ‘and’.

Implications 

In this section, we will have a look at the implications. In Mathematics, statements with “if-then” are very common.

Let’s consider the statement:

q: If you are born in a particular city, then that city is your birthplace.

There are two statements:

q: you are born in a particular city

r: that city is your birthplace

Then the sentence “if q then r” says that in the event if q is true, then r must be true always.

“if q then r” where it does not mention any sort of demand or places then r when q is false. For example, if you are not born in the city, then you cannot say anything about r.

There are many different ways to understand “if q then r” statements. Let us illustrate these ways in the context of the following statement. r: If a number is a multiple of 12, then it is a multiple of 3. Let q and r denote the statements q: a number is a multiple of 12. r: a number is a multiple of 3.

Then, if q then r is the same as the following:

1. q implies r is denoted by q r. The symbol stands for implies. This says that a number is a multiple of 12 implies that it is a multiple of 3.

2.q only if r. This says that a number is a multiple of 12 only if it is a multiple of 3.

3. q is a sufficient condition for r. This says that knowing that a number as a multiple of 12 is sufficient to conclude that it is a multiple of 3.

4. r is a necessary condition for q. This says that when a number is a multiple of 12, it is necessarily a multiple of 3. 5. r implies q.

This says that if a number is not a multiple of 3, then it is not a multiple of 12.

Contrapositive and converse

There are also certain other statements which are contrapositive and converse.

Here we will consider the following “if-then” statement. Actually, there are statements that convey the same meaning. Well, we will look at the following example:

Example: Let us find the contrapositive of the following statements.

          (i) If a number is divisible by 12, then it is divisible by 3.

(ii) If you are born in Delhi, then this state is your birthplace.

(iii) If a triangle is found to be equilateral, it is isosceles.

 

Solution The contrapositive of these statements are

 

(i) If a number is not divisible by 3, it is not divisible by 12.

(ii) If you are not born in Delhi, then this state is not your birthplace

(iii) If a triangle is not found to be isosceles, then it is not equilateral.

So, you can find that the above examples show the contrapositive of the statement if q, then r is “if r, then q”. Next, we will have a look at the other term which is called “converse.”

The converse of a given statement “if q, then r” is if r, then q.

For example, the converse of the statement p: If a number is divisible by 10, it is divisible by 5 is q: If a number is divisible by 5, then it is divisible by 10.

Validating Statements  

In this section, we will find out when a statement is true. It is important to know the right way as to how to follow some general rules and techniques to find a valid statement. Let’s have a look at the example:

Example:  Find out whether the following statement is true or not.

                If x, y Z are such that x and y are odd, then xy is odd        

Solution Let q: x, y Z such that x and y are odd

     r: xy is odd To check the validity of the given statement, we assume that if q is true, then r is           true. q is true means that x and y are odd integers.

              Then x = 2m + 1, for some integer m.

y = 2n + 1, for some integer n. Thus xy = (2m + 1) (2n + 1) = 2(2mn + m + n) + 1 This shows that xy is odd. Therefore, the given statement is true.

 

Role of Doubtnut for Class 11 Maths students

Students can find online study materials to be quite immersive as this helps to clear all their confusions. So, Doubtnut has played a pivotal role in the life of the students. Some of the benefits of learning maths via Doubtnut are:

  • Free to download and access it:  Doubtnut provides the online study materials at zero cost. Students do not have to pay any amount to access or download the solutions. The flexibility in access to solutions develops a liking for the subject.
  • Use of simple and lucid language: Each step in the video tutorials is explained in a simple language. All these solutions available as video tutorials help in understanding and also retention of the concepts in a better way.
  • Boosts the confidence of the students:  The subject matter experts have curated and reviewed video tutorials for ease in the understanding of the students. The solutions in pdf format can be downloaded and accessed anytime and anywhere. Thus, with the help of readily accessible solutions, the rigorous practice of problems will boost the confidence in students before appearing in the exam.

Share this on :-

bottom open in app