Click Question to Get Free Answers >

Principle Of Mathematical Induction NCERT Solutions : Class 11 Maths

NCERT Solutions for Class 11 Maths : Principle Of Mathematical Induction

Doubtnut
DoubtnutDoubtnut
Filter
Filters :
    Classes
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
    Chapters
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  •   
  • 6 More
    Exercises
  •   
  •   
cancel imageFilter
Apply
CLASSES
    Change Class
CHAPTERS
    Change Chapter
EXERCISES

NCERT Class 11 | PRINCIPLE OF MATHEMATICAL INDUCTION | Solved Examples | Question No. 08

Prove the rule of exponents `(a b)^n=a^n b^n` by using principle of mathematical induction for every natural number.

play button

NCERT Class 11 | PRINCIPLE OF MATHEMATICAL INDUCTION | Solved Examples | Question No. 07

Prove that `1^2+2^2+""dot""""dot""""dot""+n^2>(n^3)/3,""` `n in N`

play button

NCERT Class 11 | PRINCIPLE OF MATHEMATICAL INDUCTION | Solved Examples | Question No. 06

Prove that `2. 7^n+3. 5^n-5` is divisible by 24, for all `n in N` .

play button

NCERT Class 11 | PRINCIPLE OF MATHEMATICAL INDUCTION | Solved Examples | Question No. 05

Prove that `(1+x)^ngeq(1+n x),` for all natural number n, where `x >-1.`

play button

NCERT Class 11 | PRINCIPLE OF MATHEMATICAL INDUCTION | Solved Examples | Question No. 04

For every positive integer n, prove that `7^n-3^n` is divisible by 4.

play button
 Latest from Doubtnut
play button
play button
play button
play button
play button

Doubtnut one of the best online education platform provides free NCERT Solutions of Maths for Class 11 Principle Of Mathematical Induction which are solved by our maths experts as per the NCERT (CBSE) guidelines. We provide the solutions as video solutions in which concepts are also explained along with answer which will help students while learning , preparing for exams and in doing homework. These Solutions will help to revise complete syllabus and score more marks in examinations.

Get here free, accurate and comprehensive NCERT Solutions for Class 11 Maths Principle Of Mathematical Induction which have been reviewed by our maths counsellors as per the latest edition following up the CBSE guidelines. We provide video solutions in which solutions to all the questions of NCERT Class 11 Maths textbook are explained in step by step and detailed way.

The Topics of the Chapter Principle Of Mathematical Induction are :

THE PRINCIPLES OF MATHEMATICAL INDUCTION

It contains these exercises along with solved examples. All the exercises are solved in the video. Select the exercise to view the solutions exercisewise of the Chapter Principle Of Mathematical Induction:

NCERT Solutions Class 11 Maths Chapter Principle Of Mathematical Induction Exercises:

We have covered all the exercises and also Solved examples in the videos. Along with the practise exercise Students should also practise solved examples to clear the concepts of the Principle Of Mathematical Induction. If incase you have any doubt you can watch the solutions for the given questions.Watch the solutions for the given questions in which it is also explained in the video steps to solve the questions along with answers.

French mathematician Blaise Pascal has found the principle of mathematical induction. The name induction was given by English mathematician John Wallis. Nowadays this concept is used in different branches of mathematics. Under this chapter, you will study the principle of mathematical induction, how it was found and proved. After further studies and researches, this principle of mathematical induction was used to provide proof of the binomial theorem. Deductive reasoning is told as the key basis of mathematical thinking. Other than this we will also learn about the difference between deductive and inductive reasoning. All these topics are thoroughly covered in NCERT books which is a must-have for the students studying in CBSE board. Other than the book all the solutions of the above chapter are also provided on our website which will help you to understand the concepts and theory of the chapter in an easy and better way.

NCERT textbooks are the most preferred among the students studying in CBSE board. These books are provided with an ample number of exercises and examples for practice so that students become master in the subject. NCERT study material is helpful in board exams and as well as for competitive exams like IIT-JEE, BITSAT, NEET. Summary at the end of every chapter for quick and easy revision is given in the textbook. The concept in the book is based on daily life activities so that we are able to understand the chapter in an easy and efficient manner.  The whole syllabus is covered in the book according to the need of students and definition and content in the chapter is given in easy language so that we understand it in a better way. 

Doubtnut is an e-learning platform that provides solutions to every chapter of the NCERT textbook in a comprehensive manner. The solutions presented are free of cost and can be accessed by anyone from anywhere. NCERT solutions for class 11 maths are provided in pdf format on our website for easy access to solutions. Solutions are given in an easy manner on the website so that students can access it anytime and make most of it and learn the concepts in a better way. These methods include video lectures and tutorials with the use of appropriate graphs, diagrams, and images, and formulas, etc. Doubts of students are clarified by providing the link of the solutions on the website.

Topics & Subtopics of NCERT Class 11 Maths Chapter 4 Principle of Mathematical Induction

The chapter is further divided into topics and subtopics so that you have a clear picture of the whole chapter in brief. So that it becomes easy for everyone to understand the contents of the chapter.

Deductive Reasoning

It is the process of reasoning in which two-three statements are taken into consideration to reach certain logical conclusions.

Example –

  • Eight is divisible by two.
  • Any number divisible by two is an even number

Therefore,

      Eight is an even number.

From the above example, we have two statements about even number and eight and on the basis of those two statements third, one is proved and is a true statement.

Therefore, we can say it is a process of proving a statement or theorem with valid deductive steps which are derived and proof may or may not be true on the basis of conclusions found. It can apply in general to particular cases.

Inductive Reasoning

It is a process in which different cases are studied, all evidence found are checked and analyzed, observation is done for each and every case and all are combined to reach a specific conclusion.

It is different from deductive reasoning.

In simple language, induction can be termed as a process of generalization on the basis of particular results or facts

What is the principle of mathematical induction?

To prove certain statements or results which are formulated in terms of n where n is a positive integer a specific principle is used which is based on the special technique is called a principle of mathematical induction.

Let us find the formula for the sum of positive integers 1, 2, 3,...,n, that is, a formula which will give the value of 1 + 2 + 3 when n = 3, the value 1 + 2 + 3 + 4, when n = 4 and so on and suppose that in some manner we are led to believe that the

formula 1 + 2 + 3+...+ n = n(n+1)      is the correct one.

                                            2

This process does not prove the formula for all values of n. Therefore, we need some kind of chain reaction which will have the effect that once the formula is proved for a particular positive integer the formula will automatically follow for the next positive integer and the next indefinitely. This type of solution can be obtained from the process of mathematical induction.

The principle of mathematical induction

According to the principle of mathematical induction, to prove a statement that is asserted about every natural number n, we have two things to prove. If the statement is true for n = k, then it will be true for its successor, k + 1. ... The sum of the first n odd numbers is equal to the nth square. To understand the concept, we see the following -

Let us consider a given statement P(n) involving the natural number n such that

(i) The statement is true for n = 1, i.e., P(1) is true, and

(ii) If the statement is true for n = k (where k is any positive integer), then the statement is also true for n = k + 1, i.e., the truth of P(k) indicates the truth of P (k + 1).

Then, P(n) is true for all-natural numbers n.

  • Property a) mentioned above is simply a statement of a fact. In these situations, where the statement is also true for all the cases of n≥5, then the step a) shall start from n=5 and we shall hence verify the result for n=5, i.e., P(5).
  • Property b) shows a conditional property as it does not confirm that the given statement is true for n=k, but if it is true for n=k then it should also be true for n=k+1.

So, to prove that the property holds, only we have prove that conditional proposition:

Therefore, if the statement is true for n = k, then it is also true for n = k + 1.

This is known as the inductive step. The assumption that the given statement is true for n = k in this inductive step is called the inductive hypothesis.

For example, frequently in mathematics, a formula is discovered that appears in a pattern like

1 = 12 =1

4 = 22 = 1 + 3

9 = 32 = 1 + 3 + 5

16 = 42 = 1 + 3 + 5 + 7

25 = 5= 1 + 3 + 5 + 7 + 9

Hence we see and on the basis conclude that the sum of the first two odd natural numbers is the square of second natural number, the sum of the first three odd natural numbers is the square of third natural number and so on. Thus, from this pattern, it appears that

1 + 3 + 5 + 7 + ... + (2n – 1) = n2 i.e, the sum of the first n odd natural numbers is the square of n.

Let us write

P(n): 1 + 3 + 5 + 7 + ... + (2n – 1) = n2.

We wish to prove that P(n) is true for all n.

The first step in a proof that uses mathematical induction is to prove that P (1) is true. This step is called the basic step. Obviously

1 = 12, i.e., P (1) is true.

The following step is called the inductive step. Here, we consider that P (k) is true for some positive integer k and we need to prove that P (k + 1) is true. Since P (k) is true, we have

1 + 3 + 5 + 7 + ... + (2k – 1) = k2 ... (1)

Let us Consider

1 + 3 + 5 + 7 + ... + (2k – 1) + {2(k +1) – 1} ... (2)

= k2 + (2k + 1) = (k + 1)2 [Using (1)]

Therefore, P (k + 1) is true and the inductive proof is now completed.

Hence P(n) is true for all natural numbers n

Benefits of Doubtnut

  1. An ample number of exercises and examples are provided on the website so that all the concepts and theories are clear and there is no doubt left.
  2. Video lectures of the concepts are also available which can be accessed whenever you require and these are very helpful in understanding the topic easily and effectively.
  3. We also provide links of solutions to you if you post some queries/ doubts regarding any topic regarding anything you read on our website and we make sure that every doubt of yours is cleared.
  4. We also provide pdf solutions to the topics covered in NCERT books.
  5. We make sure that no topics are left untouched and students are benefitted in every possible way.

Share this on :-

bottom open in app