Random or probabilistic experiments

Question from  Class 11  Chapter Probability

Apne doubts clear karein ab Whatsapp par bhi. Try it now.
CLICK HERE

Loading DoubtNut Solution for you

Watch 1000+ concepts & tricky questions explained!

141.2 K+ views | 65.6 K+ people like this

   
Share
Share

Answer Text

Solution :
<h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Random Experiments </strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">In this article, we will focus on the Random Experiments in Proababilty, its types and examples and the distinction between deterministic and random experiments.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="color:#000000">The theory of a</span><span style="color:black"> </span><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/what-is-probability-1339036" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">probability</a><span style="color:black"> </span><span style="color:#000000">developed as a result of studies of games of chance or gambling. Suppose you pay Rs. 2 to draw a card out of a pack of 52 cards; if the card drawn is an ace, you get Rs.20,&nbsp; else nothing.&nbsp; Will you indulge yourself in such a game? Will it give a fair chance of winning or will you be looser in the long run? No one knows, but the answers to these questions lead to the development of the modern theory of probability. </span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Random Experiments and Sample Space</strong></span></span></span></h2> <h3><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>What is an Experiment?</strong></span></span></span></h3> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">An action (or operation) which results in some outcomes is called an experiment. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="color:#000000">Sometimes, the result comes out to be unique. For instance, if any</span><span style="color:black"> </span><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/what-is-triangle-1338516" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">triangle</a><span style="color:black"> </span><span style="color:#000000">is given then without knowing the three angles, we can undoubtedly say that the sum of three angles is always 180&deg;. &nbsp;Such experiments can be termed as Deterministic Experiments. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">Sometimes, the result may not be unique. For example, when a coin is flipped, there is a possibility of either&nbsp; head or &nbsp;tail. Such experiments are called Probabilistic or Random Experiments.</span></span></span></p> <h3><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Random Experiment Definition</strong></span></span></span></h3> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">An experiment that satisfies two conditions i.e. it should result in two or more outcomes and when it is not possible to tell (predict) the outcome in advance is called random experiments. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">Following are the examples of random experiment:</span></span></span></p> <ol> <li><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">Tossing a coin</span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">Tossing two coins simultaneously</span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">Tossing a coin thrice</span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">Drawing of a card from a pack of 52 cards</span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">Throwing of a dice</span></span></span></li> </ol> <h3><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Sample space Definition</strong></span></span></span></h3> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="color:#000000">It is the collection of all possible outcomes of a random experiment is called </span><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/sample-space-6953858" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Sample Space</a><span style="color:black"> </span><span style="color:#000000">and is usually denoted by the letter &lsquo;S&rsquo;. Each element of the sample space is called a Sample Point.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">For example:</span></span></span></p> <ol> <li><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">When we toss a coin once, it can come up in two ways- head or tail. So there are two possible outcomes of a random experiment. If we denote head by H and tail by T, then the sample space of this experiment will be-</span></span></span></li> </ol> <p style="margin-left:48px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">S= {H, T}</span></span></span></p> <ol start="2"> <li><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">When we roll a dice, it may land with any of its 6 faces pointing upwards. Thus, the result of this experiment is getting any of the six numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. Hence, the sample space for this experiment would be</span></span></span></li> </ol> <p style="margin-left:48px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">S= {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6}</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><strong>Related Videos:</strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:16px"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/deterministic-experiments-1339886" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Deterministic experiments</a></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:16px"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/what-is-probability-experiments--1339885" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">What is probability experiments</a></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:16px"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/algebra-of-events-1339890" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Algebra of events</a></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:16px"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/elementary-event-sample-space-and-examples-1339888" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Elementary event sample space and examples</a></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:16px"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/what-is-event-occurrence-of-event-1339889" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">What is probability of occurrence of event</a></span></span></li> </ul> <h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Random Experiments- Types of Events</strong></span></span></span></h2> <h3><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>What is an event?</strong></span></span></span></h3> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="color:#000000">An event in probability is the subset of the sample space associated with a random experiment. &nbsp;When the outcome of an experiment matches the condition mentioned in the </span><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/event-30198678" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline"><span style="color:#000000">event</span></a><span style="color:#000000">, then we say that the event has occurred.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">For example- In an experiment of tossing a pair of coins, an event E may be getting two heads. If the pair of coins come up with two heads, then we say that the event E has occurred, otherwise we say that the event E has not occurred.</span></span></span></p> <h3><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Simple Event Definition</strong></span></span></span></h3> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="color:#000000">The event which has only one sample point (outcome) of the sample space is called simple event or</span><span style="color:black"> </span><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/elementary-event-1339038" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">elementary event</a><span style="color:black"> </span><span style="color:#000000">or indecomposible event. For instance, when 3 coins are tossed up, the simple events are {HHH}, {TTT}.</span></span></span></p> <h3><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Compound Event Definition</strong></span></span></span></h3> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">The event which has two or more than two sample points (outcomes) of the sample space is called compound event or decomposible event. For example when 3 coins are tossed, {HHT, HTH, THH, TTT} is a compound event corresponding to the statement &ldquo;getting atleast two heads&rdquo;.</span></span></span></p> <h3><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Sure Event Definition</strong></span></span></span></h3> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">The sample space S is termed as sure event. Let us understand it better with an example: when we throw a die, the sample space, S= {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6}. Obtainiing a number less than 7 is a sure event, but getting &nbsp;a number less than 4 is not a sure event. </span></span></span></p> <h3><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Impossible Event Definition</strong></span></span></span></h3> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">The sample space which corresponds to null set &Oslash; is an impossible event. For example, in the case of die, getting a number less than 1 is an impossible event.</span></span></span></p> <h3><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Equally Likely Outcomes Definition</strong></span></span></span></h3> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">If there is no reason for any outcome to occur in preference to any other outcome, then we say that the outcomes are equally likely. For instance, in drawing a card from a well shuffled pack, all the 52 possible outcomes are equally likely. Getting a spade is as likely as getting a diamond (there are 13 cards of each); getting a card of king is as likely as getting a queen (there are 4 cards of each).</span></span></span></p> <h3><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Exhaustive Event Definition</strong></span></span></span></h3> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="color:#000000">The events <em>E<sub>1</sub>,E<sub>2</sub>,&hellip;.E<sub>n</sub></em> associated with a random experiment with sample space S are called</span><span style="color:black"> </span><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/exhaustive-events-1339895" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">exhaustive events</a><span style="color:black"> </span><span style="color:#000000">if E<sub>1</sub> &cup; E<sub>2 </sub>&cup; &hellip;. &cup; E<sub>n</sub> = S</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">For example, if S = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6}, B= {2, 4, 6}, C={ 1, 2, 3, 4}, then A&cup;B = S, so A and B are exhaustive events. But A&cup;C = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5} &ne; S, so A and C are not exhaustive events.</span></span></span></p> <h3><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Mutually Exclusive Events Definition</strong></span></span></span></h3> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="color:#000000">Two or more events of a random experiment are called </span><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/mutually-exclusive-events-1339894" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">mutually exclusive</a><span style="color:black"> </span><span style="color:#000000">if the occurrence of any one of them excludes the occurrence of the other events. A and B will be mutually exclusive if&nbsp; A <strong>&cap;</strong> B = &Oslash; (null set).</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">For example:</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">In a deck of cards, let A={getting a spade}, B={getting a heart}, C={getting a king}, then A and B are mutually exclusive as A<strong>&cap;</strong>B = &Oslash; whereas A and C are not mutually exclusive as A<strong>&cap;</strong>C= {king of spade} &ne; &Oslash;</span></span></span></p> <h3><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Mutually Exclusive and Exhaustive Event Definition</strong></span></span></span></h3> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">Let S be the sample space of a random experiment, then the events <em>E<sub>1</sub>,E<sub>2</sub>,&hellip;.E<sub>n</sub></em> of S are called mutually exclusive and exhaustive if E<sub>1</sub> &cup; E<sub>2 </sub>&cup; &hellip;. &cup; E<sub>n</sub> = S</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">For example, let A= {getting a spade}, B={getting a heart}, C={getting a club} and D={getting a diamond}, then A,B, C, D are mutually exclusive and exhaustive events.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><strong>Important Chapters:</strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/ncert-solutions" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">NCERT Solution for Maths</a></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/ncert-solutions/class-11-maths-chapter-16-probability-1" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">NCERT Solution for Maths Class 11 Chapter Probability</a></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/ncert-solutions/class-9-maths-chapter-15-probability-1" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">NCERT Solution for Maths Class 9 Chapter Probability</a></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:16px"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/ncert-solutions/class-10-maths-chapter-15-probability-1" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">NCERT Solution for Maths Class 10 Chapter Probability</a></span></span></li> </ul>

Related Video

4:03

33.3 K+ Views | 51.4 K+ Likes

3:17

237.1 K+ Views | 776.4 K+ Likes

1:37

60.6 K+ Views | 136.6 K+ Likes

2:49

444.8 K+ Views | 1 M+ Likes

10:40

700.3 K+ Views | 431.6 K+ Likes

bottom open in app